The Loving God – a Warrior

The Loving God – a Warrior

We as believers continue day to day seeking the return of our Savior, we promote His love, as we should and know full well the goodness of God leads us to repentance.  Who can find love like that, a goodness that is unparalleled, willing to die to make us live?  He didn’t have to leave His position in the Heavens except Love compelled Him, drove Him to follow a plan set forth before time and agreed by the Godhead (God Father, God Son and God Holy Spirit).  Praise the Lord, Jesus said, “I will go”, put myself subject to human flesh yet not defeated by flesh and I will make a way for mankind.  The coming seed of David without an end.  There is no other event in times past, present or future that can or will fulfill prophecy except this event of the Jesus (God) Messiah coming to earth which He did 2017 years ago.  So the Light came into the world, man must accept this gift for eternal life. No one else will come, the sacrifice has been made, and it was finished on the cross. “For God so loved the world that he gave His only begotten Son, that whosoever believes in Him shall not perish but have everlasting life. John 3:16.

Please hear His voice, look at His word and ask yourself in sincerity, ask God in sincerity to reveal His self to you, open your heart to him and look to Him as the Living God who made you and knows you and wants to fill you with purpose and His ways.  He will not always be just a loving savior, He will come next time as a warrior to execute justice and he reserves wrath for His enemies.

 

Click to view the verse and Dake notes:

Nahum 1:2-9 (KJV)

God is jealous, and the LORD revengeth; the LORD revengeth, and is furious; the LORD will take vengeance on his adversaries, and he reserveth wrath for his enemies.

The LORD is slow to anger, and great in power, and will not at all acquit the wicked: the LORD hath his way in the whirlwind and in the storm, and the clouds are the dust of his feet.

He rebuketh the sea, and maketh it dry, and drieth up all the rivers: Bashan languisheth, and Carmel, and the flower of Lebanon languisheth.

The mountains quake at him, and the hills melt, and the earth is burned at his presence, yea, the world, and all that dwell therein.

Who can stand before his indignation? and who can abide in the fierceness of his anger? his fury is poured out like fire, and the rocks are thrown down by him.

The LORD is good, a stronghold in the day of trouble; and he knoweth them that trust in him.

But with an overrunning flood, he will make an utter end of the place thereof, and darkness shall pursue his enemies.

What do ye imagine against the LORD? he will make an utter end: affliction shall not rise up the second time.

Dake Bible Notes:

Notes For Verse 2

[God is jealous, and the LORD revengeth; the LORD revengeth, and is furious; the LORD will take vengeance on his adversaries, and he reserveth wrath for his enemies …]

The 1st Prophecy in Nahum

Ten Predictions — Fulfilled:

  1. With an overrunning flood He will make an utter end of Nineveh (Nah. 1:8-9).
  2. Darkness will pursue His enemies (Nah. 1:8).
  3. Affliction will not rise up a second time (Nah. 1:9).
  4. They shall be devoured as stubble fully dry (Nah. 1:10).
  5. There is one come out of you that imagines evil against the Lord, a wicked counselor (Nah. 1:11).
  6. Though they be quiet, and likewise many, yet they shall be cut down (Nah. 1:12).
  7. Though I have afflicted you, I will afflict you no more.
  8. For now I will break his yoke off of you, and break your bonds in pieces (Nah. 1:13).
  9. I will cut off the graven image and the molten image out of the house of your gods (Nah. 1:14).
  10. I will make your grave, for you are vile.

Fifteen Predictions — Unfulfilled:

  1. The Lord will revenge Israel (Nah. 1:2).
  2. He will take vengeance on His adversaries.
  3. He will reserve His wrath for His enemies.
  1. He will not acquit the wicked (Nah. 1:3).
  2. He will rebuke the sea and make it dry (Nah. 1:4).
  3. He will dry up all the rivers.
  4. Bashan, Carmel, and Lebanon will languish.
  5. The mountains will quake at Him (Nah. 1:5).
  6. The hills will melt.
  7. The earth will be burned at His presence, and all that dwell therein.
  8. No man will be able to stand before His indignation, or the fierceness of His anger (Nah. 1:15).
  9. His fury will be poured out like fire.
  10. The rocks will be thrown down by Him.
  11. Behold upon the mountains the feet of him that brings good tidings, that publishes peace (Nah. 1:15).
  12. The wicked man will not pass through anymore but will be utterly cut off. The next prophecy in Nahum is Nah. 2:1ff.

[jealous]

Seven Attributes of God

  1. Jealousy (Nah. 1:2)
  2. Longsuffering (Nah. 1:3)
  3. Justice
  4. Omnipotence (Nah. 1:4-5)
  5. Holiness (Nah. 1:6)
  6. Goodness (Nah. 1:7)
  7. Omniscience

[furious] The Lord is the possessor of wrath; literally, the Lord of wrath.

Notes For Verse 3

[slow to anger]

If God were as quick tempered as man, many things would be completely destroyed in His anger. It is to our advantage that He weighs all matters and makes a merciful and just decision before He acts. It is stated six times that He is “slow to anger” (Nah. 1:3Neh. 9:17Ps. 103:8145:8Joel 2:13Jonah 4:2). Man is advised to be “slow to wrath” (Jas. 1:19). Anyone slow to anger is “of great understanding” (Prov. 14:29), “appeaseth strife” (Prov. 15:18), and “is better than the mighty” (Prov. 16:32).

[great in power]

God is great in power (omnipotent), absolutely just, and therefore the only one capable of being Sovereign over all.

[the LORD hath his way in the whirlwind and in the storm, and the clouds are the dust of his feet]

Twenty facts about God:

  1. He manifests jealousy (Nah. 1:2).
  2. He demonstrates anger (Nah. 1:2-3).
  3. He takes vengeance on enemies (Nah. 1:2).
  4. He reserves wrath for enemies.
  5. He is slow to anger (Nah. 1:3).
  6. He has great power.
  7. He will not acquit the wicked.
  8. He has His way in the whirlwind.
  9. He has His way in the storm.
  10. He stands on the clouds.
  11. He rebukes the sea (Nah. 1:4).
  12. He makes the sea dry.
  13. He dries up rivers.
  14. He causes earthquakes (Nah. 1:5-6).
  15. He will renovate the earth (Nah. 1:5).
  16. None can stand before His wrath (Nah. 1:6).
  17. He is good (Nah. 1:7).
  18. He is a stronghold in the day of trouble.
  19. He knows them that trust Him.
  20. He brings judgment when needed (Nah. 1:8-14).

Notes For Verse 4

[He rebuketh the sea, and maketh it dry]

Here we have statements expressing the omnipotence of God. He is capable of doing all these things, and has done them in the past when bringing certain judgments. He will also do them in bringing future judgments. God has already rebuked the sea (Ps. 104:7), made it dry (Ex. 14:12), dried up rivers (Josh. 3:172Ki. 2:8,14), and sent famine to Bashan, Carmel, and Lebanon (2Sam. 21:12Ki.

6:25). The mountains have quaked (Ex. 19:181Sam. 14:151Ki. 19:11), the earth has been burned by the fire and men have been destroyed (Gen. 19: 24; 1Ki. 19:12); and this will happen again in the future (Heb. 12:18- 282Pet. 3:10-13Rev. 6:12-178:1-129:1-2111:1316:17-2118:1-24).

Notes For Verse 5

[all that dwell therein]

See Gen. 41:56, note, for the use of “all.”

Notes For Verse 6

[Who can stand before his indignation?]

Question 1-2. Next, Nah. 1:9.

[his fury is poured out like fire, and the rocks are thrown down by him]

These statements with those of Nah. 1:4-5 could easily refer to the future renovation of the heavens and earth by fire, as in Heb. 1:10-1212:25-282Pet. 3:10-13Rev. 20:7-10.

Notes For Verse 7

[The LORD is good, a stronghold in the day of trouble; and he knoweth them that trust in him]

Three facts which comfort in trouble:

  1. The Lord is good (Nah. 1:7).
  2. He is a stronghold.
  3. He knows them that trust Him.

Notes For Verse 8

[But with an overrunning flood he will make an utter end of the place thereof, and darkness shall pursue his enemies]

Here the “burden of Nineveh” begins. The Ninevites were asked what they imagined against the Lord; then a prediction of utter destruction of the city was made (Nah. 1:8-9).

Notes For Verse 9

[What do ye imagine against the LORD?]

Question 3. Next, Nah. 2:11.

[affliction shall not rise up the second time] Nineveh’s destruction was to be complete and final the first time; there would be no need for a second destruction.

Dake’s Annotated Reference Bible: Containing the Old and New Testaments of the Authorized or King James Version Text.

And I will put enmity between thee and the woman, and between thy seed and her seed: he shall bruise thy head, and thou shalt bruise his heel

Ancient Hebrew Research Center

And I will put enmity between thee and the woman, and between thy seed and her seed: he shall bruise thy head, and thou shalt bruise his heel

Shalom Friend:

Genesis 3:15 is a very interesting passage for many different reasons. Take a look at these three translations for this verse.

And I will put enmity between thee and the woman, and between thy seed and her seed; it shall bruise thy head, and thou shalt bruise his heel. (KJV)

And I will put enmity between thee and the woman, and between thy seed and her seed; they shall bruise thy head, and thou shalt bruise their heel. (JPS)

And I will put enmity between thee and the woman, and between thy seed and her seed: he shall bruise thy head, and thou shalt bruise his heel. (ASV)

Notice that each version translates one pronoun in three different ways. The King James Version uses “it,” the Jerusalem Publication Society uses “they” and the American Standard Version uses “he.” In the Hebrew, the word that is found here is היא (hu) and is the masculine singular pronoun-he. Other than this issue, all three say pretty much the same thing.

Now, let us examine the Hebrew behind the last part of the verse according to the ASV.

“he shall bruise your head, and you shall bruise his heel”

The following is the Hebrew for this phrase.

הוא ישופך ראש ואתה תשופנו עקב (hu yeshuph’kha rosh v’atah teshuphenu eqev)

Let’s examine each of these words very carefully. The first word is the pronoun הוא (hu), which we previously discussed meaning “he.” The second word is ישופך (yeshuph’kha). This verb includes the letter yud (י) as a prefix and identifies the subject of the verb, which is the word הוא (hu), as masculine singular. The letter yud also identifies the verb as imperfect (similar to our future tense). Following the letter yud is the actual verb, which is שוף (shuph) and means to fall upon another in an attack, or to strike. Following the verb is letter kaph (ך) and identifies the object of the verb as second person masculine singular (you). The entire verb ישופך (yeshuph’kha) then means “he will strike you.” The third word is ראש(rosh) and is generally translated as “head.” These first three words would literally be translated as “he will strike you head.” As you can see this really doesn’t make a lot of sense and this why the translators chose to translate this as “he will strike your head.” However, if this is what was meant by the author, it would have read, הוא ישוף ראשך (hu yeshuph rosh’kha), but I will come back to this later.

The next word is ואתה (v’atah), which is the word אתה meaning “you,” with the prefixed letter vav (ו) meaning “and.” The next word is תשופנו(teshuphenu). This verb includes the letter tav (ת) as a prefix and identifies the subject of the verb, which is the previous word אתה (atah), as second person masculine plural (you). The letter tav also identifies the verb as imperfect (similar to our future tense). Following the letter tav is the actual verb, which is again the word שוף (shuph) meaning to strike. Following the verb is suffix נו (nu) and identifies the object of the verb as third person masculine singular (him). The entire verb תשופנו (teshuphenu) then means “you will strike him.” The next word is עקב (eqev) and is generally translated as “heel.” Putting these three words together we have a literal translation of “and you will strike him heel,” but again, this does not make sense, so the translators chose to ignore the grammar and translated it as “you will strike his heel.” If this is what was meant by the author, then it would have read, ואתה תשוף עקבו (v’atah teshuph eqevo).

Now let’s put all of this together.

He will strike you head, and you will strike him heel.

The head of the body is at the top of the body and the Hebrew word ראש (rosh-head) can mean “first.” For instance, in 1 Chronicles 16:7 the King James Version, the American Standard Version and the Revised Standard Version translate this word as “first.” Likewise, the heel is at the bottom of the body and the Hebrew word עקב (eqev-heel) can mean “last.” For instance, in Genesis 14:19 the King James Version and Young’s Literal Translation translate this word as “last.” With this understanding, we can now translate this phrase as follows.

He will strike you first, and you will strike him last.

 

 

Jeff & Denise Benner
Ancient Hebrew Research Center
Mechanical Translation Project

Alaska Court’s Ruling on Abortion and Parental Notification Hurts Teens

Alaska Court’s Ruling on Abortion and Parental Notification Hurts Teens

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Jana Minich / Elizabeth Slattery /

Hillary Kieft grew worried when her daughter didn’t arrive from school on the bus as usual. After she called the school to find out what was wrong, a school nurse pulled into her driveway with the daughter (let’s call her “Kelly”) in tow. The nurse explained that she had taken Kelly for counseling after school, according to LifeNews.com, which reported on the Kieft story.

But, in fact, the nurse took Kelly to have an abortion.

In New Zealand—where the Kieft family lives—it is completely legal for a minor to have an abortion without her parents’ knowledge. Parents like Hillary Kieft have no legal right to be involved in their child’s decision to have an abortion, or even to be notified before it happens.

With her parents still unaware of the abortion, 15-year-old Kelly spiraled into depression, self-harm, and eventually attempted suicide. It was only when Kelly finally told her parents about the abortion that they could begin helping her cope—not only with the abortion, but also with the sad reality that the procedure had caused irreparable damage and she would never be able to become pregnant again.

As a LifeNews.com article about Kelly points out:

The fact that a school needs permission to take your child on a field trip, but not for surgery, is beyond ridiculous. The same teen needs parental consent before getting a tattoo or using a tanning salon … Has abortion really become such a taboo subject that we are willing to just ignore all legal oversights rather than face the wrath of abortion advocates?

Fortunately, in the United States, most states have parental consent or notification laws.

Generally speaking, the law reflects the fact that parents are responsible for the well-being of their children, and are most likely to have their best interests in mind. That’s why parents have to sign waivers for almost any medical care for their children.

But this just changed for Alaskan families, thanks to a lawsuit brought by Planned Parenthood attacking the state’s parental notification law.

Alaska law required that minors seeking an abortion notify their parents unless they receive approval from a court (known as a judicial bypass). This notification requirement was intended to foster parental involvement in such a life-changing decision.

The state argued that its interests in requiring notification include encouraging parents to be involved in their minor child’s decision whether to have an abortion, protecting the physical and mental health of minors, and preventing sexual abuse.

In a 4-1 decision last month, the Alaska Supreme Court concluded that the state’s notification law violated the Alaska Constitution’s equal protection clause because it drew an unjustified “distinction between pregnant minors seeking to terminate and those seeking to carry to term.”

Essentially, the majority ruled that the law is unfair because it required parental notification for abortion but not for care related to maintaining a healthy pregnancy until birth. It is true that Alaska allows pregnant teens to receive pregnancy-related health care without parental consent; otherwise many young girls might avoid obtaining needed care.

But, Justice Craig Stowers, the lone dissenter, explained, the law “necessarily differentiates between minors seeking an abortion and minors who intend to carry to term” because mandating parental notification before a minor can receive prenatal care may threaten the health of the mother and the growing child. Stowers observed that “no useful purpose is served by … requiring parental consultation for carry-to-term decisions.”

Stowers also wrote that providing parents with an opportunity to discuss the consequences of abortion with their child is both a clearly valid reason for the law, and completely in line with U.S. Supreme Court decisions like Planned Parenthood of Southeastern Pennsylvania v. Casey (1992).

The law is necessary, he pointed out, to ensure that “the people society holds responsible for her well-being—her parents—will be informed of what is happening in her life.” He noted that previous cases from this very court said that parental notification requirements would further the compelling interest of parental involvement. But the majority now “undermines the parents’ rights and responsibilities in this regard and makes a mockery of its earlier proclamations of the proper and fundamental role parents have traditionally played in their children’s lives,” Stowers writes.

Stowers further noted that the law does not stop a minor from obtaining an abortion against her parents’ will. It only requires that they know, which gives them a chance to exercise their right and responsibility of involvement in their daughter’s life. The law even created an “easily navigable, broad bypass process” that would allow a judge to approve an abortion for the minor without parental notification.

The bottom line is that parents, rather than abortion clinic staff or school nurses, deserve the right to be involved in their minor daughter’s decision whether to terminate her pregnancy. After all, clinics are businesses that do not necessarily prioritize the health and safety of patients over their ability to turn a profit—just look at the conditions of some clinics that were so bad that many states have passed reforms in recent years aimed at increasing the standards at clinics.

As a result of this decision by the Alaska Supreme Court, instead of receiving counsel from their parents, minors may be pressured into making a life-altering decision and forced to hide any emotional or physical struggles from their parents after the fact. Eliminating parental notification is a step in the wrong direction and harms, rather than helps, girls like Kelly.